Book Nook: March



104A1WB-NHuZhL._SL1500_-SFWYummy Yucky

By Leslie Patricelli
Genre: Fiction
Age Range: Baby/Toddler
Reviewed by Emily Eileen Carter

After it was given to me by my school librarian, my son and I have loved reading this “opposites” book about yummy and yucky foods. Vibrant photos fill opposite pages and exclaim, for instance, “Blueberries are yummy. Blue Crayons are yucky.” This book resonates so well, as my son in his long-lasting oral stage puts everything in his mouth. It’s a good reminder that socks aren’t a “yummy” food and neither is soap, though he has tried to eat them both.

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Ten Little Fingers and Ten Little Toes
By Mem Fox & Helen Oxenburry
Genre: Fiction
Age Range: Baby/Toddler
Reviewed by Emily Eileen Carter

This lyrical rhyming book chronicles the counting of those precious tiny fingers and toes of babies near and far. With the charming illustrations of babies from all around the globe, my son and I have enjoyed reading this sweet book and pointing out fingers and toes of other babies and then counting his. As this endearing book reminds mommies at the end, the most precious fingers and toes are those that belong to our beloved babes.

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104-phantom-SFWThe Phantom Tollbooth
By Norton Juster
Genre: Young Adult Fiction
Age Range: 8–12 years old
Reviewed by Lisa S.T. Doss

Milo is a boy who is bored. With nothing to do or worth seeing, he is surprised to find a tollbooth in his bedroom, complete with toy car, money and a detailed map. While he thinks he is on the road to “Expectations,” Milo loses focus and arrives in the land of the “Doldrums.” Creativity in this modern fairy tale will encourage readers to follow Milo and his three companions on the journey to rescue the only two princesses, “Rhyme and Reason,” who can provide harmony to the city of words, “Dictionopolis,” and the city of numbers, “Digitopolis.” Readers will become captivated by the thought-provoking characters named “Chroma,” an orchestra conductor who play the world’s colors; “.58,” a boy who is only .58’s of a person; and the “Everpresent Wordsnatcher,” a bird that will take the words right out of your mouth. Published in 1961, The Phantom Tollbooth is a timeless book worth your time.


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