Hillcrest Vision



Hillcrest Vision offers personal attention and professional care to each of their patients. Ensuring that patients are informed about every aspect of their eye care is of utmost importance. The approach of Drs. Juawana Hall and Lisa McAllister and their staff is to ensure patient comfort, providing their patients with quality eye care and the latest in eyewear options—all within a relaxed, welcoming atmosphere.

 

As Dr. Hall shared, her hope is that patients consider their eye exam as a part of their normal health care. She explained, “There is no other sense that you use more than sight. It affects every area of life.”

 

During a typical eye examination, Dr. Hall stated, “There may be areas that need to be addressed, other than not seeing well.” Patients may not necessarily realize other medical conditions have an impact on their eye health. For instance, oral allergy medicines can dry your eyes. Daily medications for arthritis, anti-depressants, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes can impact eye health. Skin cancer and issues in the eye have a connection that may present itself during an exam of the eye. As Dr. Hall explained, “Checking the vessels in the eye is critical. That is the only place in the body that can be examined without having to be cut open.”   That makes it clear that sharing family history or existing conditions during an eye exam is an important component of ones’ overall health. And, an eye exam may uncover unknown conditions that need to be addressed.

 

Other conditions can also impact the eyes. “Dry eye” may be one of two types. One type results in decreased tear production and may be attributed to medication, hormonal conditions, or aging. With the other type of dry eye, tears evaporate too quickly. About 80% of dry eye patients have the second type, which can be attributed to high computer usage and staring (the normal blink rate drops by half). Dry eye condition generally requires a customized approach, according to Dr. Hall. Each patient and situation is different and requires an individualized treatment plan.

UV exposure and blue light from electronics can be an issue for eye health. Dr. Hall recommends using the 20/20/20 Rule to help those who use computers or other electronic devices on a continual basis. This involves consciously making an effort to look away from the screen frequently, blinking (don’t stare down the screen), and shifting focus. A hot compress mask may also be helpful in relieving eye fatigue.

 

Another condition frequently associated with vision is headaches. In children, headaches are the first indicator of potential vision problems. Pediatricians typically do not perform a full eye examination during physicals. Since children with poor vision “don’t know what they can’t see,” as Dr. Hall explained, “an eye check-up is important, especially given that 80 percent of learning is visual.” All children should have their eyes checked before starting school and every two years after that. If a child starts complaining or begins having problems in school, make an eye examination one of the first steps to finding a solution.

 

On average, a healthy patient needs an eye examination every two years if under 50 years, and once a year after that.

 

For patients requiring vision correction, Hillcrest Vision offers over 900 frames for men, women, and children. Selections include budget-friendly, stylish/fashion forward, European designs, and safety glasses. Hillcrest Vision has one of the largest selections around for children and infants. Making a decision on eyewear is important for those who need glasses to see well. Glasses are of no use if not worn; the Hillcrest Vision team wants to ensure their patients have a variety to suit every person.

 

Hillcrest Vision is located at 2341 Winterhaven Lane in Winston-Salem. Their hours are Monday through Thursday from 8:00 am to 5:30 pm and Fridays, 8:00 am to 1:00 pm. You may contact them via phone at 336.760.2020 or 336.253.5454, or visit their website at 222.hillcrestvision.com. Also, check them out on their Facebook page.

 


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