The Return of the Grinch



The Christmas season arrived early this year with a scowl and donned from head to toe in green!

“Don’t forget the Grinch!”  Cindy Lou said, with a tone in her voice suggesting prayers should also include “all the loveable creatures in the world, especially those who are mean.”  Angelic and adorable though she may be, Cindy Lou of Whoville confirms the less than attractive traits by declaring, “I know he’s mean and hairy and smelly.  His hands might be cold and clammy, but I think he’s actually kind of sweet.”  Bless Cindy Lou’s heart—a child who helped the cave-dwelling Grinch realize the true meaning of Christmas.

Fact: The following lines indicate the age of the writer, “Why for fifty-three years I’ve put up with it now!  I must stop Christmas from coming! But how?”

Fact: In 1966, the animated version had difficulty receiving an endorsement to air on television in time for Christmas. Over two dozen sponsors were shown the storyboard and turned it down.  Despite the line, “Perhaps Christmas doesn’t come from a store,” it was a bank that finally agreed to endorse the show.  It aired on December 18th.

A Part of Our Lexicon:  According to the Merriam-Webster, a Grinch is a killjoy and spoilsport. Even the term, “grinchy” has made an entry into our lexicon as being “comparative: more grinchy or grinchier, superlative: most grinchy or grinchiest.  1.  To possess the qualities of a Grinch, and from the origin of “grinch +y.”

Fact:  Inspired by the word “grinch,” Theodor Geisel felt like the term itself in regard to the Christmas holiday.  Soon after Christmas, he began writing a story to rediscover a feeling he felt was lost.

Language Similar to Latin?  As the Whos from Whoville arrive Christmas morning to form a solemn circle by extending hands to clasp the newcomer, the bells begin to ring.  It is the introductory music to the words, “Fahoo forays, dahoo dorays.  Welcome Christmas!  Come this way.  Fahoo forays, dahoo dorays.  Welcome Christmas, Christmas Day….”

Fact:  The rhyming words “dahoo and fahoo” and “dorays and forays” were created to sound similar to Latin.  After the animated show aired, viewers sent in letters requesting an English translation.

Fact:  In the movie adaptation of the Grinch, actors attended a “Who-School” to learn the choreography of a Who’s stature, posture, and movement.

Max:  Ah, Max, the Grinch’s trusty dog, and faithful companion.  A mutt who accepts the command to have a tree branch tied to his head, and the task of pulling a sleigh down Mount Crumpet, as well as two thousand feet up the vertical hill to the peak.  Winning the hearts due to his sweet grin and easy disposition, the Grinch offered the first slice of “Roast Beast” to dear ole’ Max.  Not only did the Grinch’s heart grow three sizes in one day, those around him, especially Max, would receive in the days that followed unconditional love and kindness.

Fact:  Chuck Jones experienced a problem. The program needed to last 26 minutes; however, reading the story took only 12.  A decision was made to focus on Max, the dog.  The storyboard included scenes where Max is tied to the sleigh and zooming down the mountainside.

Fact: Biographers wrote, “Max represents the audience, in that we see the Grinch through his eyes.”  From the facial expressions and antics of Chuck Jones’ childhood dog, “Max,” the dog continues to live.

The Story Adds New Interest in 2018: The new film adaptation of The GrinchWho Stole Christmasarrived in theaters last month. One more variation to expose children of all ages to the story of how the Grinch willingly returns the most important gifts of the season, friendship and togetherness!

Fact:  On the official website, www.seussville.com, fans of Dr. Seuss can locate the recipes for interesting Whoville foods, among other information for parents about books, games, and news, presented in a newsletter!


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