Trick or Treat Options



The time for treats is just around the corner. Are you looking for options other than taking your kids door-to-door or driving them to friends and family all over town, just to ask for candy? There are other options—fun, safe, and creative ways to let kids (and parents) enjoy the evening and share the fun (and candy).

Check out these options . . .

Trick or Treat through the Office: Take a break from the day-to-day office routine and offer employees the option to bring their kids in after school for trick or treating. Let the kids dress up (maybe the employees, as well) and let that inner child have fun, too!  This option works for employees’ children or even a selected organization or school. It’s easy to pull off. Bring in candy/treats by the department or individually and let the children trick or treat their way through the office. Maybe include a costume contest and some fun activities in the lobby before they start their treat walks. Perhaps offer customized treat bags for each child and include small school supplies, as well as candy.

Trunk or Treat:  Many organizations and churches host trunk or treat events in their parking lots. This can end up as a friendly competition to see who can decorate their truck the best or even have a themed truck event with the hosts in costume, too. Typically, there are planned activities in addition to treating. The kids enjoy the fun; parents get in on the action if their “truck” is one of the stops.  It’s a fun-filled evening.

Pumpkin Patches:  Perhaps a local pumpkin patch has a planned event for kids with games, tractor rides, and treats. Check to see if there are special plans for kids on Halloween at your favorite place to get your pumpkin.

Haunted Trails/Haunted Houses:  If you enjoy being scared or having a good scream, visit one of the local trails or houses in the area. Depending on the age of your children, these may be great fun for the family. Forget the candy—let the screams begin!

Trick or Treat at a Nursing Home:  If a local nursing home is offering to host trick or treaters, this may be a wonderful option. Let’s face it; many residents don’t get that many visitors. What could put a smile on someone’s face faster than a little child dressed as their favorite princess or action hero? The connection between the older and younger generation is priceless and a win for everyone involved. You may find yourself adopting one of the residents to visit as a family or a group “grandparent” for a class.

Have a Costume Party:  Host a block party for the neighborhood kids, Sunday School class, etc. Make it a tradition and rotate to other houses every year.

Have each family bring a bag of candy for a giant grab bowl of candy. Plan a costume contest, decorate sugar cookies, carve pumpkins, have game stations—let your imagination take the lead.

Movie Marathon, Anyone?:  Not everyone enjoys going trick or treating. If that’s the case for your kids, plan a movie marathon for them. Depending on their ages, Casper, Hocus Pocus, Adams Family, and of course, The Great Pumpkin are great options. Movie options for older kids and teens can range from funny to creepy/scary with Freddy, Michael, or Chucky leading the list.

Use your imagination for other ways to spend family time together. Perhaps host a scavenger hunt and have the kids work to find their treats. Buy or make a Halloween piñata and enjoy watching the scramble for candy, once it’s finally broken. Got a fire pit in your background? Bring on the S’mores.  BOO!  Happy Halloween, y’all!


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